Legal Issues in Egg Freezing

If you are considering freezing your eggs, it is a good idea to consult with an attorney specializing in reproductive law in order specify what should happen to your eggs in the event of your death.

Even though eggs are not fertilized and do not bring up as many of the same moral and ethical questions as planning for the future of embryos, they are your biological tissue, and you should decide what to do with them if you are not around to use them. Make sure that any agreements that you sign at the fertility clinic are in agreement with your wishes and your own estate plans. 

There are numerous questions that an attorney can walk you through. For example, if you died, would you want your eggs donated to a frozen egg bank? Or, would you want a family member to have the option of using them? Do you want your estate to continue to pay for their storage? If a family member or friend conceived a child from your eggs, would you want that child to inherit from your estate? Or, would you want your eggs destroyed or donated for research?

Ideally these are decisions that should be made before having your eggs frozen. No one likes to think about death at a time when they are planning for future life, but consulting with an attorney who specializes in reproductive or family-building law can put your mind at ease knowing any eventualities are taken care of according to your wishes.

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